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Media Materials


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Media Materials


Below you'll find the official media release, film stills, and more. If you would like additional materials or have any questions, please contact Matt Johnstone.

Media Release


Media Release


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

THE LIBERATORS DOCUMENTARY SELECTED FOR WORLD PREMIERE AT SXSW FILM FESTIVAL

Director Cassie Hay to Bring True Story of Texan’s Multi-Million Dollar Treasure Heist to Austin

 

AUSTIN, TEXAS – February 2, 2016 – Cassie Hay’s first full-length documentary, The Liberators, chronicling the decades-long search for the Quedlinburg Treasure, has been selected to have its world premiere at South By Southwest (SXSW) Film Conference and Festival in March.

The film follows Willi Korte – referred to by some as “art’s Indiana Jones” – on his journey to track down a stolen collection of medieval treasure. From WWII-era Germany to the National Archives in Washington D.C., the film takes the audience on a mesmerizing journey that eventually leads to the tiny Texas town of Whitewright, near the Oklahoma border. But as Korte gets closer to uncovering the truth, he stirs up a firestorm of controversy and conflict that rocks the suspect’s family and their small community.

“Hunting the Quedlinburg Treasure actually defined and established my career. It made me what and who I am today,” remarked Willi Korte, regarding his journey. “At a time when thousands of years of history are blown to pieces or plundered in other parts of the world, the Quedlinburg case shows us how much is lost if we don't show respect for our religious and cultural heritage.”

The Liberators is directed by North Texas native and New York University graduate Cassie Hay and is produced by Death and Taxes Production Company. The Liberators marks Hay’s feature-film directorial debut.

“It’s such an honor to be selected for SXSW Film,” said Cassie Hay. “I love that the festival continues to select films that are bold and offer a fresh perspective, which I feel is a great reflection of the culture and film scene here in Austin at the moment. To top it off, our story is, in large part, a Texas story, so it's just icing on the cake to be showing it to a home audience.”

The SXSW Film Conference and Festival runs March 11-19, 2016.

 

ABOUT CASSIE HAY
Cassie Hay was raised in Denison, TX and currently lives in Austin, TX.  She earned a BFA in Film/TV from NYU and an MFA in Creative Non-Fiction Writing from FDU. Other film and television work includes Law & Order, Bored to Death, The Wolf of Wall Street, and most recently, The LeftoversThe Liberators marks her feature-film directorial debut.

To access media and press information for the film, please visit TheLiberatorsMovie.com.                                                                                                                                      

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Film Stills


Film Stills


Quotes


Quotes


There’s always another part of the story.
— Dick DeGuerin, renowned Texas laywer
In fact, no one knew. I was coming in from work, and I seen all these cameras and pictures and people running all over town, and they says, ‘Mayor, they waitin’ on you to come.’ And I said, ‘What?’ And they says, ‘They just found a treasure in town.’ I said, ‘What!? What do you mean treasure’?
— Bill Goodson, former mayor of Whitewright, Texas
I mean the Quedlinburg Treasures, of course, are of tremendous religious, historical value. It’s not just another painting or another museum piece. It’s something that has a history of over a thousand years, and I couldn’t think of any other case that I could ever pursue for the rest of my life that would have that kind of significance.
— Willi Korte, historian and researcher
The list of things stolen by the Nazis is as broad as anyone can imagine. If it had monetary value or historic value, it was stolen, if it wasn’t destroyed beforehand. The Monuments officers were there to protect it regardless of what country it came from, including things that belonged to Germany.
— Robert Edsel, Founder and Chairman, Monuments Men Foundation; and author of The Monuments Men
And then there was one person that lived out in White Rock, which is a few miles out of here, and I knew him very well. He used to drive Joe Meador to Dallas all the time. And I asked him - and we called him Skunk - and I said, “Skunk, have you heard anything about this so-called treasure stuff ‘round here?” And he said, “Well, I’ve seen some of it, but I didn’t know what it was.
— Bill Goodson, former mayor of Whitewright, Texas
One day this man came in and said he was looking for a picture of Joe Meador, and I said, “Well, it seems like I remembered something in our file. Let me go see what I have.” So I pulled the file out and I found - I think there were three negatives - of him holding some orchids that he grew. So we talked a little while and he said he was from New York and I remember he said he was doing something on orchids. I said, “Well, I don’t know that we would need three negatives of this so here, you can take one of ‘em and you don’t have to worry about bringing it back.” Because he was dead, he had already died, and I couldn’t see why we would need a picture of a man who was deceased with an orchid. So I gave him one of the negatives and the next day it came out in the New York Times.
— Donna Hunt, former editor of The Denison Herald
At the end of the war when he was in the South of France, [Joe Tom Meador] stole silverware. For that, he got court marshalled. So was he a pathological thief or was it this sort of attitude that the spoils of war go to the victor? I don’t know.
— Willi Korte, historian and researcher
I have found that, frequently, good people do bad things. And that doesn’t make them bad people. I have an attitude about that even though someone may have committed a criminal act, that they deserve consideration for the way that they’ve lived the rest of their lives.
— Dick DeGuerin, renowned Texas laywer
People say, ‘Well, why should I care about cultural treasures?’ Well, for one, they belong to you. Whether they’re in Iraq, whether they’re in Syria, whether they were in the Soviet Union during World War II, they’re the shared cultural treasure of everybody...it belongs to everybody. So, when you steal something like that, you’re stealing it from you, me, and anybody else that’s out there.
— Robert Edsel, Founder and Chairman, Monuments Men Foundation; and author of The Monuments Men

Film Poster


Film Poster